SCHNABEL & PRO ARTE QUARTET Schubert:

This album is included in the following sets:

SCHNABEL & PRO ARTE QUARTET Schubert: "Trout" Quintet (1935) - PACM034

Regular price €0.00 €8.00 Sale

Regular price €0.00 €14.00 Sale

All our CDs are produced to order. Please note that there will therefore be a short delay between placing an order and it being ready to leave us. We'll let you know by e-mail when your order ships

Overview

SCHUBERT Piano Quintet in A major, D.667, "Trout"
Recorded Abbey Road Studio 3, London, 16 November 1935
Duration 33:33

Artur Schnabel, piano
The Pro Arte Quartet

This set contains the following albums:

Schnabel plays Schubert's Trout Quintet

With the Pro Arte Quartet, remastered for finest sound quality


    Artur Schnabel's recording of Schubert's 'Trout' Quintet, with members of the Pro Arte Quartet augmented by Claude Hobday is rightly seen as one of the great recordings of its age, and although one might have wished for a slightly different pairing of string players more suited to Schnabel's style, this wonderful performance is a definite must.

    I had long intended to continue our exploration of the recordings of both the Pro Arte Quartet and Artur Schnabel with this particular piece, but finally it was re-reading Vikram Seth's excellent novel An Equal Music that prompted me to get these discs out and transfer them.

    From a restorater's point of view this recording caused a couple of difficulties en route - the discovery that one of the discs was cracked from edge to centre, and that this crack then continued partway through the other side of the record, threatening to break clean through, almost made me abort the project. Fortunately I was able to get good transfers from this disc - good enough to eradicate all sonic traces of the crack.

    Other difficulties included the usual British HMV 'bacon frying' crackle, plus a tendency to overload distortion whenever the double bass played a particularly loud note. I'm pleased to report that both these problems were solved, and the unusual sonic combination of a string quartet comprising violin, viola, cello and double bass comes through as being in excellent balance, both internally, and with the piano. The result is one of my favourite chamber music restorations for quite a while!

    Andrew Rose


    SCHUBERT Piano Quintet in A major, D.667, "Trout"
    Recorded Abbey Road Studio 3, London, 16 November 1935
    Matrix Numbers: 2EA.2529--2538, takes 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 4, 2, 2, 2
    Duration 33:33


    Artur Schnabel, piano
    with
    The Pro Arte Quartet:

    Alphonse Onnou, violin
    Germain Prévost,
    viola
    Robert Maas,
    cello
    Claude Hobday,
    double bass


    Bill Rosen's Review

    This restoration leaps forth with brilliant piano tone and really resonant gutsy strings

    First the sound! For 50 years, I have been listening to this famous performance on a gray-jacketed EMI "Great Recordings of the Century" LP. The sound was as gray and as two-dimensional as the cover. Suddenly the sound of this restoration leaps forth with brilliant piano tone and really resonant gutsy strings. There seems to be some three dimensionality in the recording and I sense space between the piano and strings. Well might the restorer, Andrew Rose, consider this one of his most successful restorations. Might one ask whether he can do an equivalent job with Schnabel's Mozart G Minor Piano Quartet?

    Unlike Andrew Rose, I feel that Schnabel and the Pro Arte Members are well-matched. This is not a sweet, dreamy Trout. This has vigor, conflict and bite. Schnabel is tough, but does not dominate. The Pro Arte give as good as they get. For example, in the fourth movement variations while the piano frolics and darts, the urgent high trills of the violins pursue it with demonic vigor and do not let it get away. Both Schnabel and the Pro Arte are dedicated classicists and the touches of romanticism (confined to the second movement) are not many. It is not just that this is an historic performance; it is a performance given by artists who are utterly sure of their artistic vision. And that makes it both modern and essential.