Malcolm Sargent

Malcolm Sargent
Sir Harold Malcolm Watts Sargent (29 April 1895 – 3 October 1967) was an English conductor, organist and composer widely regarded as Britain's leading conductor of choral works. The musical ensembles with which he was associated included the Ballets Russes, the Huddersfield Choral Society, the Royal Choral Society, the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, and the London Philharmonic, Hallé, Liverpool Philharmonic, BBC Symphony and Royal Philharmonic orchestras. Sargent was held in high esteem by choirs and instrumental soloists, but because of his high standards and a statement that he made in a 1936 interview disputing musicians' rights to tenure, his relationship with orchestral players was often uneasy. Despite this, he was co-founder of the London Philharmonic, was the first conductor of the Liverpool Philharmonic as a full-time ensemble, and played an important part in saving the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra from disbandment in the 1960s.

As chief conductor of London's internationally famous summer music festival the Proms from 1948 to 1967, Sargent was one of the best-known English conductors. When he took over the Proms from their founder, Sir Henry Wood, he and two assistants conducted the two-month season between them. By the time he died, he was assisted by a large international roster of guest conductors.

At the outbreak of the Second World War, Sargent turned down an offer of a major musical directorship in Australia and returned to the UK to bring music to as many people as possible as his contribution to national morale. His fame extended beyond the concert hall: to the British public, he was a familiar broadcaster in BBC radio talk shows, and generations of Gilbert and Sullivan devotees have known his recordings of the most popular Savoy Operas. He toured widely throughout the world and was noted for his skill as a conductor, his championship of British composers, and his debonair appearance, which won him the nickname "Flash Harry."
Close
Malcolm Sargent

Malcolm Sargent

Sir Harold Malcolm Watts Sargent (29 April 1895 – 3 October 1967) was an English conductor, organist and composer widely regarded as Britain's leading conductor of choral works. The musical ensembles with which he was associated included the Ballets Russes, the Huddersfield Choral Society, the Royal Choral Society, the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, and the London Philharmonic, Hallé, Liverpool Philharmonic, BBC Symphony and Royal Philharmonic or...
Read More
18 albums
Download from €7.00 | Buy on CD from €10.00

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 3
SCHUBERT Symphony No. 8 'Unfinished'

Recorded in 1960 & 1961 in stereo
Total duration: 76:58

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Sir Malcolm Sargent
conductor

Download from €14.00 | Buy on CD from €20.00

ELGAR Cello Concerto
ELGAR The Dream of Gerontius

Live concert broadcasts, 1961 & 1962
Total Duration: 1hr 58:32

Jacqueline du Pré, cello
BBC Symphony Orchestra

Richard Lewis, tenor
Marjorie Thomas,
mezzo
John Cameron,
baritone
Hudderfield Choral Society
Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra

Sir Malcolm Sargent, conductor

Download from €6.00 | Buy on CD from €10.00

ELGAR "Enigma" Variations
ELGAR Pomp and Circumstance Marches 1 & 4

Recorded in 1953
Duration: 43:10

London Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Sir Malcolm Sargent

Download from €13.00 | Buy on CD from €20.00
ELGAR  The Dream of Gerontius, Op. 38

Recorded in 1945
Duration:1hr 30:04

Heddle Nash, Gladys Ripley,
Dennis Noble, Norman Walker
Huddersfield Choral Society
Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra
Sir Malcolm Sargent, conductor
Download from €14.00 | Buy on CD from €20.00
GILBERT & SULLIVAN The Pirates of Penzance

SULLIVAN Cylinder Recordings
Studio recording, 1959-60, Additional recordings, 1899-1914
Total duration: 1 hr 50:19

George Baker Major-General Stanley
Monica Sinclair Ruth
James Milligan The Pirate King
Glyndebourne Festival Chorus
The Pro Arte Orchestra
Conductor Sir Malcolm Sargent 
Download from €6.00 | Buy on CD from €10.00

HOLST The Planets
Recorded in 1954
Duration 47:12
London Symphony Orchestra
conducted by Sir Malcolm Sargent